"If you're a dead female artist, you're still playing catch-up with the guys."
 NEW YORK - NOVEMBER 15: A man holds his hand up while bidding on a work of art inside the auction house Christie's during the Post-War and contemporary Art sale November 15, 2006 in New York City. Christie's estimates that works by Warhol, Willem de Kooning, Roy Lichtenstein and others could go for up to $220 million in what the auction house says may be the most valuable post-World War II and contemporary art auction in history. Warhol's 'Mao' portrait from 1972 went for over 17 million, setting an all time record for the artist. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

NEW YORK - NOVEMBER 15: A man holds his hand up while bidding on a work of art inside the auction house Christie's during the Post-War and contemporary Art sale November 15, 2006 in New York City. Christie's estimates that works by Warhol, Willem de Kooning, Roy Lichtenstein and others could go for up to $220 million in what the auction house says may be the most valuable post-World War II and contemporary art auction in history. Warhol's 'Mao' portrait from 1972 went for over 17 million, setting an all time record for the artist. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Gender disparities in the art world on NPR.

Take a listen to this NPR interview with Shankar Vedantam, NPR's social science correspondent. Steve Inskeep, Host.

This is shocking, but really nothing new to those of us who are in the business. Oxford’s finance professor, Renee Adams, presents actual research to inform those of you who are not [in the business].

(If audio player is not visible below, please visit https://www.npr.org/2018/09/18/649060336/researchers-explore-gender-disparities-in-the-art-world).

The original interview and transcript of the story, can be found:

https://www.npr.org/2018/09/18/649060336/researchers-explore-gender-disparities-in-the-art-world

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