Posts tagged john singer sargent
Method to the Magic and Other Creative Musings, Jennifer McChristian

Often people ask me about the difference between how I work when painting a studio piece versus how I work when painting outdoors. With plein air there is a certain amount of spontaneity, mental fortitude and ingenuity that is required to complete a painting in one session.  Working en plein air engages you in its visceral experience and makes you more sensitive to subtle color changes and tonal gradations due to changing atmospheric conditions.  Because of these quickly changing conditions I am forced to paint in a more intuitive and expressive manner, capturing the essence and impression of my subject matter and omitting unnecessary and irrelevant detail.  Painting from life is essential to every artist.  It sharpens the memory, dramatically improves draftsmanship, and gradually enhances painting proficiency. 

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Bring Something to the Table, Larry Moore

I've been an artist a long, long time. I took my first steps as a commercial artist at age 13 painting t-shirts, dresses, vans and murals with an airbrush some 45 years ago. And I've devoted a great deal of that time since to the study of art, I had four years of art history in college, most of which I slept through, that is, until my mother insisted I go to Europe for a 6 week art and humanities tour which changed the way I looked at art. Mom's are good like that. After that, I really started to explore what is out there, past and present. If you are reading this, you are a devotee of creating, of being an artist, and as I am sure you have learned, a very big part of being an artist is growth. I am always looking, experimenting, searching for new ideas, new ways of doing things, never satisfied with my own little status quo. As I look back, change has been the one constant in my life, from airbrushing clothes to graphic design to painting stuff to look like stuff. It's been a good run.

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Four Ridiculously Simple Ways to Improve Your Painting, Carolyn Anderson

1. Stop and Look Yes, I know this one sounds obvious, but after 25 years of teaching workshops, I can tell you the most common mistake artists make is to quit looking. I’ve seen far too many artists veer off into trite and predictable painting after a good,strong start simply because they stopped looking at the subject and the canvas with a critical eye.This is often the result of what I call “brush-overdrive” which basically means a person will move the brush around on the canvas just because the brush is in the hand. We could also call it “automatic painting” - something similar to automatic writing which is defined as writing without conscious thought. Although we would all probably like some painting spirit hovering overhead telling us what to do next, count that option as not available and deal with the choices at hand. Just because there is a brush in your hand does not mean you actually have to make a mark on the canvas. Moving the brush and actually putting paint down do not always have to go together.

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